Opaeula.co.uk

A dedicated forum and online store for the Opae ula shrimp! 

■ We sell Opae ula Shrimp and Brackish water Macroalgae via our UK eBay store HERE
Share photos/videos, journals and logs for your Opae ula tank setups for others to read.
 #6173  by gsimy
 16 Dec 2018 16:13
i want to build a small tank (about 15 liters) for Opae'ula
but i have some questions
- i want to use a very fine inert white sand (about 0,3 - 0,1 mm) for substrate. is it good? or is it better a gravel?
- i want to use lava rocks, but i read some people had problems with them because sometimes they release iron. anyone have problem?
- the person who could give me the shrimps keep them at a density about 1.005 - 1.012, and say that variations of salinity is better for breeding. is it better keep them at more stable salinity or not?
- the question temperature: my room temperature during winter never go down 17 °C. is it better put a heater for keeping a temperature more high (20 °C) or is it useless?
 #6174  by odin
 16 Dec 2018 16:52
Let me give you my experiences:

1) That sand will be fine
2) Lava rocks are fine, i prefer them.
3) Shrimps of all types do better in stable conditions, these shrimp will tolerate salinity swings but it advise keeping it the same so draw a small line or marker on the outside of your tank and when the water drops to evaporation you know where to fill up to with RO/distilled/bottled water.
4) Keep the water at 20deg C minimum for best results, add a heater (1watt of power per liter of tank water) and this will just flick on when the set temp is reached and will keep your water warm... be sure to have a thermometer too for checking.

I hope that helps!
gsimy liked this
 #6176  by gsimy
 16 Dec 2018 18:00
thanks for the advices

another stupid question: where the algae will come from in the tank? nothing come from nothing...
 #6177  by odin
 16 Dec 2018 18:32
I’m going to have to quote this,


'Chlorophytes or green algae are single celled plants, containing chlorophyll in order to photosynthesise and moreover we have them to thank for breathable oxygen as much if not more than any other species of plant.

They fill bodies of water making them look green, just as the sea is green, but doesn't look that way if all you have is a glass of seawater - algae individually being single-celled are microscopic. You can't see them as individuals you only see them when there is a lot of them, then they look green. Even if you have one cell of it in a healthy state it photosynthesises and has chlorine so it is green in theory but nobody can detect it so in practice it is only green in groups.

The cells are so small that they easily get caught up when wind passes over water. The amount of them is so small that you won't see them looking green in the air. The amount you would have in a glass if seawater that doesn't look green has algae in it equivalent to from here to the horizon in air.

But that is quite enough to contaminate a body of water left open to the air. So you will find no bodies of water in most climate zones of earth which remain clear of algae for long. It takes one cell to plop down in a body of water with light and micronutrients and off they go. Within a week in the right conditions they are capable of filling any size of water and the amount of them there will be depends on how rich the pickings are.’

Source: https://www.quora.com/How-does-algae-ge ... fish-tanks


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
gsimy liked this
 #6179  by Algae In Space
 17 Dec 2018 07:01
gsimy wrote: 16 Dec 2018 16:13 i want to build a small tank (about 15 liters) for Opae'ula
but i have some questions
- i want to use a very fine inert white sand (about 0,3 - 0,1 mm) for substrate. is it good? or is it better a gravel?
- i want to use lava rocks, but i read some people had problems with them because sometimes they release iron. anyone have problem?
- the person who could give me the shrimps keep them at a density about 1.005 - 1.012, and say that variations of salinity is better for breeding. is it better keep them at more stable salinity or not?
- the question temperature: my room temperature during winter never go down 17 °C. is it better put a heater for keeping a temperature more high (20 °C) or is it useless?

I think Master Odin gave you good advice. You could get the book "Hawaiian Anchialine Pools" and you will see that there is a surprisingly vast diversity of Opae Ula habitats. Many different conditions. There are pools with as little as 1.003 or as much as over 1.030 and temperatures can get very warm.
gsimy liked this
 #6180  by tzg
 17 Dec 2018 16:55
Algae In Space wrote: 17 Dec 2018 07:01
gsimy wrote: 16 Dec 2018 16:13 i want to build a small tank (about 15 liters) for Opae'ula
but i have some questions
- i want to use a very fine inert white sand (about 0,3 - 0,1 mm) for substrate. is it good? or is it better a gravel?
- i want to use lava rocks, but i read some people had problems with them because sometimes they release iron. anyone have problem?
- the person who could give me the shrimps keep them at a density about 1.005 - 1.012, and say that variations of salinity is better for breeding. is it better keep them at more stable salinity or not?
- the question temperature: my room temperature during winter never go down 17 °C. is it better put a heater for keeping a temperature more high (20 °C) or is it useless?

I think Master Odin gave you good advice. You could get the book "Hawaiian Anchialine Pools" and you will see that there is a surprisingly vast diversity of Opae Ula habitats. Many different conditions. There are pools with as little as 1.003 or as much as over 1.030 and temperatures can get very warm.
will they breed under those 'extreme' conditions?
 #6183  by Algae In Space
 17 Dec 2018 23:58
tzg wrote: 17 Dec 2018 16:55
Algae In Space wrote: 17 Dec 2018 07:01
gsimy wrote: 16 Dec 2018 16:13 i want to build a small tank (about 15 liters) for Opae'ula
but i have some questions
- i want to use a very fine inert white sand (about 0,3 - 0,1 mm) for substrate. is it good? or is it better a gravel?
- i want to use lava rocks, but i read some people had problems with them because sometimes they release iron. anyone have problem?
- the person who could give me the shrimps keep them at a density about 1.005 - 1.012, and say that variations of salinity is better for breeding. is it better keep them at more stable salinity or not?
- the question temperature: my room temperature during winter never go down 17 °C. is it better put a heater for keeping a temperature more high (20 °C) or is it useless?

I think Master Odin gave you good advice. You could get the book "Hawaiian Anchialine Pools" and you will see that there is a surprisingly vast diversity of Opae Ula habitats. Many different conditions. There are pools with as little as 1.003 or as much as over 1.030 and temperatures can get very warm.
will they breed under those 'extreme' conditions?

They will! But it's better to have more salt than less.
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 #6193  by opae ula related
 18 Dec 2018 20:17
Algae In Space wrote:
tzg wrote: 17 Dec 2018 16:55
Algae In Space wrote: 17 Dec 2018 07:01
I think Master Odin gave you good advice. You could get the book "Hawaiian Anchialine Pools" and you will see that there is a surprisingly vast diversity of Opae Ula habitats. Many different conditions. There are pools with as little as 1.003 or as much as over 1.030 and temperatures can get very warm.
will they breed under those 'extreme' conditions?

They will! But it's better to have more salt than less.
Nice find! Just amazing how long they can survive without food.
 #6194  by Algae In Space
 18 Dec 2018 22:12
opae ula related wrote: 18 Dec 2018 20:17
Algae In Space wrote:
tzg wrote: 17 Dec 2018 16:55

will they breed under those 'extreme' conditions?

They will! But it's better to have more salt than less.
Nice find! Just amazing how long they can survive without food.

Sure is :grin3:
 #6333  by gsimy
 26 Dec 2018 17:04
another question: can both marimo ball species (Aegrophila linnaei and Cladophora crispata) survive in brackish water?